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Safety Training

By Madison Hanscom, PhD The world is changing, and it is vital to prioritize organizational learning both during times of adjustment and during sustainment periods. Exemplar knowledge sharing and learning are critical components in leading a successful business, and it is also a determinant in leading a safe one. There is a clear connection between organizational learning and a safe work environment. For instance, according to the OSHA standards, organizations should implement procedures to investigate and analyze incidents in order to learn, determine preventative action, and identify opportunities for continual improvement. This is why when we think of organizational learning in the

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By Brie DeLisi “Hey! what the [email protected]&* do you think you’re doing?!” or perhaps someone just sneaks a picture of an unsafe behavior and reports it through the official reporting chain. How we handle unsafe behavior directly reflects where the safety culture is from a maturity perspective. What are the different ways that organizations can handle unsafe behavior and what does that mean for the culture? Ignore it Seeing someone performing an unsafe behavior and turning the other way demonstrates a completely disengaged safety culture. Not only is the individual going to continue to perform unsafely, but that individual has essentially been

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By Josh Williams, Ph. D. Leaders need to make sure they set intelligent safety goals to improve performance and prevent SIFs. Proper goal setting helps field leaders and employees understand the value of a unified greater purpose. They also set objective, actionable behaviors which should be integrated into daily activities. Research demonstrates that there is a statistically significant reduction in injuries when leaders effectively articulate a compelling vision and inspire employees to work towards goals that meet that mission (Hoffmeister et al., 2014). Also, a 10% improvement in employee’s understanding of organizational values and goals results in a 12.7% reduction in

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By Martin Royal In Part 1 of this blog series on training transfer, I introduced various strategies that trainees can adopt to help themselves apply what they learned in training to their work. In Part 2, I presented ideas that leaders can implement to improve the transfer of learning back into the workplace. In Part 3, we will explore the Structural dimensions of our Safe Production Model and how they apply to training transfer strategies. These structural dimensions are the physical or organizational elements of your workplace that encourage this work. The structural dimensions of your organization may include actual training transfer practices,

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By Kelly Cave and Madison Hanscom Training is an effective way for companies to facilitate knowledge and skill development in their employees, which in turn, helps them remain competitive in their respective markets. The extent to which knowledge and skills learned in training are used on-the-job is commonly referred to as training transfer (1). Unfortunately, studies indicate that significant amounts of training content do not end up transferring to the job (2). This lack of transfer is a major concern, in large part because companies spend significant amounts of money on training. According to the Association for Talent Development, each year

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By Eric Johnson When our organization engages clients, one of the first steps we perform in our assessments centers around establishing a baseline regarding the safety culture climate within the organization at all levels. These questions center around elements such as “What is the overall view of safety within the organization?”; “How do employees react to injuries – both to themselves and to others?”; “How does safety messaging impact employees”. The answers to these questions often depend on both the current safety climate but also historical data. Within the conversational aspect of our assessments, we often come across a common theme

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