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Safety Communication

By Brie DeLisi In any strong safety culture, both positive recognition and discipline are valuable. However, often organizations find the discipline piece is often considered an ‘easier’ method to drive change. Unfortunately, a focus on discipline without positive reinforcement and recognition will keep an organization at a ‘Compliant’ level of maturity – in which employees will solely focus on how to avoid punishment, rather than owning safety to keep themselves and others injury-free. You may wonder, what’s so bad about a motivation to avoid punishment? It is similar to only following the speed limit when you know there is radar and police monitoring,

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By Madison Hanscom, PhD A safety champion embodies the notion that safety comes before everything else. These individuals always have safety on the mind. They understand how safety connects to the big picture both inside and outside of work, and they are the backbone of a strong safety culture. Those who work with a safety champion know it, because it feels like someone always has your back." Researchers were interested in this topic of strong safety support. They conducted a study with railway maintenance employees to explore the extent to which perceived safety support from those around you at work might influence

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By Josh Williams, Ph.D. Leaders with effective communication skills are better able to constructively express their vision, relate to employees, and achieve their own work goals compared to leaders with poor communication skills (Poertner & Miller, 1996). This directly impacts employees’ attitudes and behaviors for safety. Which Communication Style are You? • Sheriffs are task-oriented. Their strengths include being decisive, direct, practical, and closure-oriented. However, they are often impatient, overly independent, combative, insensitive, and domineering.• Diplomats are supportive and patient. Their strengths include being consistent, easygoing, responsive to others, and effective listeners. However, they can also be too passive, indecisive, slow to change,

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By Brie DeLisi Creating and implementing safety changes in an organization is no easy task. There are so many opportunities for failure – not having a thorough plan, unanticipated roadblocks, a lack of resources, ill-suited programs and procedures. Even if all of those items are covered, the most impactful is whether or not there is buy-in from the greater employee population. Below, we’ll cover tips on how to generate employee buy-in when making changes to organizational safety. Employee Involvement – perhaps one of the most critical steps is to actually involve employee representatives in the change process itself for a number of

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By Josh Williams, Ph.D. Effective leaders continuously look for ways to increase employee safety commitment. Employees who feel committed to the organization are more likely to work safely, caution others for safety, and get actively involved in safety efforts. Those who aren’t committed rarely go beyond the call of duty for safety or anything else. In fact, they may have more serious issues such as non-compliance, absenteeism/tardiness, and confrontations with others. Organizational commitment consists of (Saal & Knight,1995): Strong support and acceptance of the organization’s values and goals. The willingness to put forward considerable effort for the organization. A strong desire to maintain membership

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By Madison Hanscom, PhD It is not a secret… when the workforce perceives that management considers safety to be as important as production, this is associated with great outcomes. A group of researchers decided to dig in deeper (1). They collected data from employees working in hazardous jobs and found what they suspected — there is a significant relationship between management commitment to safety and higher worker safety motivation, higher safety participation (safety behaviors that go above and beyond what is required), and lower injuries (1). They took it a step further by examining what these relationships look like when employees report

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