Kelly Cave

Building a Culture in Small to Midsize Businesses (SMBs)


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By Julia Borges & Kelly Cave

What is organizational culture?

Many may know the term ‘culture’ as a word that describes the behavior, thoughts, feelings, and traditions of a group of a group of people or society (1). However, in organizational change and development, its definition means something slightly different. Culture, in the context of organizations, refers to the shared norms, beliefs, and attitudes that exist among the employees of the organization (2). For example, Southwest Airlines is famous for their friendly and helpful customer-oriented culture. At Southwest, employees are empowered to go the extra mile to make customers happy, which in turn leads to more employee buy-in of the common goal centered around excellence in customer-service. Organizational culture can manifest in various ways that either accelerate or decelerate organizational performance (3). The topic of organizational culture has become an increasingly popular area of focus, both in the management consulting industry and academia. This increasing popularity has resulted in the creation of management consulting firms who specialize solely in the transformation of organizational culture. Additionally, there are certifications, academic courses, and specializations dedicated to learning about organizational culture.
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Downsizing and the impact on employees

Empty Boardroom table with chairs

By Brie DeLisi and Kelly Cave

The term “downsizing” is enough to make anyone’s brain enter into a tailspin – Am I going to be fired? Will this affect me? How will this affect my job? My family? When is it going to happen? What am I going to do? Read More...

The Hidden Costs of Disengagement

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By Kelly Cave and Brie DeLisi

Imagine having a job that makes you feel excited to go to work every day. When you get to work, you feel highly energized and identify strongly with the work you are doing. Now, on the flip side, imagine having a job that makes you dread going into work every day. This job feels like it is sapping your energy, and you spend your days counting down the hours and minutes until you get to go home. Which of these jobs would you rather have?
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Work-Life Balance: The key to healthy employees and organizations

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By Maggie Carey and Kelly Cave

What is work-life balance?



Both organizations and individuals thrive when employees feel a sense of autonomy, high morale, and overall happiness. In recent years, many have begun to think that the way to achieve this is through emphasizing the importance of work-life balance. This "work-life balance" phrase has been a buzzword in popular culture, but what exactly is work-life balance? More importantly, how can individuals and organizations reap the benefits of this concept? Occupational health researchers commonly define work-life balance as the ability to accomplish goals and meet demands in both work and personal life domains [1]. One of the major frameworks that researchers use to describe the strain that arises from a poor work-life balance is the job demands and control model [2]. According to this model, employees experience strain as a result from an overload of demands and an insufficient amount of resources to handle those demands. In the case of work-life balance, a common example of a demand many workers face is an excessive workload. One resource employees can use to handle that demand is sufficient time to complete work. However, if companies do not provide the proper resources to handle the demands employees face, strain arises, and wellbeing suffers. Read More...