Diversity is key to business success: Leaders need to make a bigger pledge to drive impact

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From Eric Michrowski

The research is very clear on the value of diversity in the workplace. And when leaders think of diversity, it shouldn’t be limited to only 1 or 2 dimensions. The goal should be to bring as many perspectives and viewpoints to the table. In addition to being fair and a good corporate citizen, the purpose of diversity is to stimulate better debate when decisions are being made. When the right culture is in place, this helps improve the quality of solutions. In turn, this drives improved business performance. Read More...

Building a Culture in Small to Midsize Businesses (SMBs)


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By Julia Borges & Kelly Cave

What is organizational culture?

Many may know the term ‘culture’ as a word that describes the behavior, thoughts, feelings, and traditions of a group of a group of people or society (1). However, in organizational change and development, its definition means something slightly different. Culture, in the context of organizations, refers to the shared norms, beliefs, and attitudes that exist among the employees of the organization (2). For example, Southwest Airlines is famous for their friendly and helpful customer-oriented culture. At Southwest, employees are empowered to go the extra mile to make customers happy, which in turn leads to more employee buy-in of the common goal centered around excellence in customer-service. Organizational culture can manifest in various ways that either accelerate or decelerate organizational performance (3). The topic of organizational culture has become an increasingly popular area of focus, both in the management consulting industry and academia. This increasing popularity has resulted in the creation of management consulting firms who specialize solely in the transformation of organizational culture. Additionally, there are certifications, academic courses, and specializations dedicated to learning about organizational culture.
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Tapping the Startup Roots of Your Big Organization

Trees with sunshine through in the fall

By Eric Johnson

Many organizations become saddled with bureaucracy over time, which is a natural evolution of complexity and the incorporation of controls to manage risks within the business. However, many businesses started from much smaller entities, where communication was easier and productivity achieved with far fewer people and assets. Often, it is heard that large businesses want to “tap into their startup roots” which is often code for fast execution, swift decision-making, and quick recovery from errors or issues. While it is absolutely possible to re-introduce the “start-up” culture into your business, it involves a mindset shift from one of top-down regulation to one that empowers employees to make decisions and execute on behalf of the customer.

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The Benefits of Self-directed Learning



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By Kelly Cave & Julia Borges

Organizations face various challenges in today’s dynamic and complex world. With constantly changing technology, markets, and social trends, organizations must quickly learn and adapt in order to remain competitive within their markets. This increase in the importance of continuous learning has encouraged many organizations to transform themselves into learning organizations. A learning organization is an organization that places a high importance on learning and continuous improvement within their culture. This can be done by creating a supportive environment, implementing concrete learning processes, and encouraging leadership that reinforces learning (Garvin, Edmondson, & Gino, 2008). Whichever processes, methods, or practices leaders use to foster this type of culture, they all have a common goal: they want their team members to embrace continuous learning as a career-long process (Ellinger, 2004). As organizations work to become learning organizations, the more learning capability at the individual level becomes critical for success (Ellinger, 2004). Read More...

Generational Differences at Work: More Conflict Than Clarity?

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By Madison Hanscom

Generational Differences at Work: More Conflict Than Clarity?
Most of us are familiar with generational stereotypes. Millennials are narcissistic, Gen Xers are cynical, and Baby Boomers are judgmental. When scanning the workplace, it might seem easy to find patterns of behavior that correspond with these generational cohort characteristics, but are these patterns actually there? And for any differences that do emerge, are these actually due to generational cohort membership? Read More...